See all of E.W. Kemble’s illustrations

from the first edition in 1885

USEFUL LINKS

Forgot your book? 

Read the novel online at the University of Virginia’s etext site.  Or download and read a first edition text.


Want to listen to Huck’s voice while you read?  Check out Loudit.org or audiobooktreasury.com.


Also from the University of Virginia, see “Representing Jim, 1885-1985,” which shows the various depictions of Jim from numerous editions.


Official Website of Mark Twain


Here’s a map of Huck’s adventures.


Huck Finn hyper-concordance.  Look up specific words or references in the text.


The Controversial Issue of...

The N-Word in Huck Finn


CRITICISM

JSTOR

The University of Virginia Library

Here is another fine resource for finding criticism.


Introductions to the novel by Harold Bloom, critic Lionel Trilling, and poet and critic T. S. Eliot in Harold Bloom’s Major Literary Characaters:  Huck Finn.


Leslie Fielder’s “Huckleberry Finn:  Faust in the Eden of Childhood”


Toni Morrison’s Introduction to Huck Finn (from The Oxford Mark Twain:  Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, edited by Shelley Fisher Fishkin)


“Two ‘Voices’ in Huck Finn” by E. Arthur Robinson--on the ambiguity of good and evil in the scene with Boggs and Colonel Sherburn


“Disenchantment:  Tom Sawyer in Huckleberry Finn by Judith Fetterly is a discussion of the change in Tom Sawyer from his novel to Huck’s and an examination of his cruelty in Huckleberry Finn.


“The Ending of Huckleberry Finn by Robert Ornstein


“Say It Ain’t So, Huck:  Second Thoughts on Mark Twain’s ‘Masterpiece’” --Novelist Jane Smiley’s strong criticism of Huckleberry Finn both as a masterfully written novel and a legitimate anti-slavery novel

BOARD NOTES--photo of the whiteboard notes from class discussions


ASSIGNMENTS

Pre-reading Webquest

Pre-reading creative writing

READING QUESTIONS


Three passages close reading

Mid-reading Poetry

Final Essay (2011-2012)

Sample Essays

OTHER WRITINGS

“The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” (1865)


“The Lowest Animal” (1906) shows Twain’s pessimistic view of the human race near the end of his life.


“The War Prayer” (1905)


“How to Tell a Story” (1897)










Listen to the BIG RIVER Soundtrack, the original cast recording of Roger Miller’s songs for the 1985 Broadway musical based on Huckleberry Finn.










Listen to the BIG RIVER Soundtrack, the original cast recording of Roger Miller’s songs for the 1985 Broadway musical based on Huckleberry Finn.

Huck Finn Essential Questions
What is the role of society in shaping who we are?
How do you go about making moral decisions?
How is the story a reflection of the American time period in which it was written?
What is the significance of dramatic irony in the novel?  (And how does this apply to the use of the racist language throughout the novel?)
What is the role of the river in the novel?  And how is it seen in contrast with the land and the world of people?

Mark Twain’s

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

LISTEN TO BIG RIVER 
(songs from the original Broadway cast)Big_River.htmlshapeimage_3_link_0